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Audited / PenTest

Revoluzion Vault / Lock Audit And Penetration Testing

The Revoluzion token vault and lock smart contract has been thoroughly tested and reviewed by Revoluzion team of experienced smart contract auditors to ensure its security and reliability. Any potential vulnerabilities or issues that were identified during the audit process were promptly addressed and fixed by us to ensure the safety and integrity of the smart contract.

Samples of Audit Report We Had Done For Token Vault / Lock

Revoluzion team of skilled smart contract auditors conducted a comprehensive audit of token vault lock smart contract on the Binance Smart Chain and Ethereum, written in Solidity code. Our audit process included both manual analysis and automated testing using state-of-the-art tools. We closely reviewed the contract's source code, including key functions such as the lock() and release() methods, to verify that they are implemented correctly and securely.
During the audit, we identified and addressed several potential vulnerabilities, including a potential replay attack vulnerability that was resolved by adding a nonce check to the lock() function:
function lock(uint256 _value, uint256 _lockTime) public {
require(_value > 0 && _lockTime > 0, "Invalid value or lock time");
require(!locked[msg.sender], "Already locked");
locked[msg.sender] = true;
value[msg.sender] = _value;
lockTime[msg.sender] = _lockTime;
// Add nonce check to prevent replay attacks
nonce[msg.sender] = now;
}
  • We also verified that the contract adheres to the ERC20 standard and implements the required functions such as transfer() and approve() correctly.
  • In addition to testing the contract's functionality, we also evaluated its gas efficiency to ensure that it can be used in a cost-effective manner on the Binance Smart Chain.
  • We conducted thorough testing of the contract's logic and functionality, including a range of negative and edge cases to ensure its robustness and resilience in the face of potential attacks.
  • Our audit report includes a detailed list of our findings and recommendations for any necessary improvements or updates to the contract's code.
We also fixed sufficient lock time for tokens
// Before fix
function lock(uint256 _value) public {
require(_value > 0, "Invalid value");
locked[msg.sender] = true;
value[msg.sender] = _value;
lockTime[msg.sender] = 1; // 1 block lock time
}
// After fix
function lock(uint256 _value, uint256 _lockTime) public {
require(_value > 0 && _lockTime > 0, "Invalid value or lock time");
locked[msg.sender] = true;
value[msg.sender] = _value;
lockTime[msg.sender] = _lockTime;
}
Including incorrect use of now timestamp:
// Before fix
function release() public {
require(locked[msg.sender], "Not locked");
require(now > lockTime[msg.sender], "Lock time not expired");
msg.sender.transfer(value[msg.sender]);
value[msg.sender] = 0;
lockTime[msg.sender] = 0;
locked[msg.sender] = false;
}
// After fix
function release() public {
require(locked[msg.sender], "Not locked");
require(block.timestamp > lockTime[msg.sender], "Lock time not expired");
msg.sender.transfer(value[msg.sender]);
value[msg.sender] = 0;
lockTime[msg.sender] = 0;
locked[msg.sender] = false;
}
In the revised version of the release() function, we replaced the use of now with block.timestamp. The now keyword returns the current time according to the node executing the contract, which can be unreliable and subject to manipulation. By using block.timestamp, we can ensure that the lock time is checked against a verified, tamper-proof value.